perspectives in writing and rhetoric

rhetorics of mobility

v.1.1(beta)



fall 2005

ryan moeller, ph.d.

mwf 2.30-3.20

rwst 214


office

rwst 312e
797.8637



an image of road signs that might be encountered while driving in Karnal, India

mobile technology analysis

40 pts.

due:
draft—2 dec.
final—9 dec.

For this assignment, I'd like you to demonstrate how a particular mobile technology affects writing practices. You may choose the mobile technology you examine and the writing practices you focus on, but you should be specific in your analysis, using examples, documented research, and specific writing practices to discuss the effects of mobile technology. Click here for the complete assignment sheet.

mobile agent field report

30 pts.

due:
draft—24 Oct.
final—4 Nov.

In computer science, a mobile agent is a piece of software that can begin on one computer and finish on another. Under the constraints of mobility, people can act as mobile agents, beginning projects and conversations in one space and finishing them in others. This assignment asks you to describe and document how people are affected by mobility and how they affect mobility or utilize its various technologies for their own benefit. Click here for the complete assignment sheet.

mobile node field report

30 pts.

due:
draft—23 Sept.
final—30 Sept.

Our textbook defines a node as an intersection between two or more modes or modal lines. It is a space for potential interchange. This assignment asks you to describe and document a node of your choice, paying special attention to discuss its rhetorical impact upon mobility. That is, how does the space or technology you define as a node contribute to new ways of thinking and knowing as well as contribute to particular social conditions? Click here for the complete assignment sheet.

group presentation

10 pts.

due: various, see presentation schedule here in PDF format.

Once through the course of the semester, you and a partner will be responsible for leading a class discussion with me (including generating study materials, additional reading assignments if so decided, and class activities) on a chapter or chapters in the ROAM textbook. You are required to meet with me at least once before your presentation (typically this will take place during office hours the week prior to your presentation) at which time you must have already completed the reading for the presentation day and have some thoughts about methods and materials we might use to present the readings and their significance. You will be assessed primarily on the study materials that you generate for the class and on the activities or discussion that we facilitate.

writing event logs

20 pts.

I am asking you to log 30 writing events through the course of the semester. Full points will be given to those students who log at least 30 events, about half of which are mobile, and where no more than 3 are posted each week. We will discuss what constitutes an event in class, but suffice it here to say that a writing event is one where something was planned or produced for a writing project. You need to be able to know where you were, what you did (decided or produced), and what technologies you used in order for the log to count.

The writing event logs should be submitted to: <http://rylish.usu.edu/mobility>. Remember to print or save a copy for your records.

participation

20 pts.

Your participation grade will largely consist of your ability to demonstrate critical engagement with the content, ideas, and people in the course. Full points will be awarded to students whose informal written work and class comments are timely and often generate stimulating ideas and conversations. This means that you must attend class regularly, demonstrate through informal writing and through class discussions that you have read and understood the material for the class, and you must participate fully in all writing workshops and peer review sessions on your papers (this means that you present full drafts of each paper when asked and that you engage your classmates in productive and substantial peer review).

In short, it is up to you to demonstrate to me that you are actively and constructively participating in the course through class behavior and through your written work.